Where have they all gone?

24 Nov

In the 1950’s there were some 30 million Hedgehogs in the UK. Today there are about half a million!

Apparently there has been little research into the reasons why but there are some obvious causes.

As we all know Hedgehogs are often killed on the road, killed by dogs and maybe killed by eating slugs who have themselves eaten Slug Pellets (although there seems to be limited evidence for this.

With the changes to the way in which  our countryside is being managed means there is less food for them but there has also been a rise in their major natural predator – the Badger. With very strong claws and being carnivorous they can easily kill and eat a Hedgehog.

Even in the past 10 years the times I have seen Hedgehogs seems to have reduced (when was the last time you saw one?)

One appeared in the drive in May, the last one before that was about 2 years ago when I found one in the garage in some distress not being able to walk so I took it to a wildlife rescue center in the Cotswold Water Park.

Hedgehog in Sherston – May 2012

While it’s really concerning that numbers have dropped so much, it’s hard to know quite how to help which is frustrating!

 

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One Response to “Where have they all gone?”

  1. Phil Warner December 11, 2012 at 11:20 pm #

    I’ve seen very few in recent years. One of those sightings was of a hedgehog, covered in leaves, strolling across my lawn in Wimbledon. I proceeded to remove several of the leaves, which turned out to be very unhelpful, as this is how they collect nest material for the winter.

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